Kivalo's Workshop- the Story of Rasidany

The most popular workshop is that of Kivalo, a small village located about fifteen kilometers north of the town of Morondava in central Menabe. Sculptors have imposed their art on it over a radius of more than one hundred kilometers for five generations. This workshop knew the most famous sakalava sculptors, some of whom, such as Rasidany and Maneraky, have acquired a national and even international reputation.

 

The dissemination of knowledge related to sculpture and the inheritance of protective charms operate until today, within this family, in a manner similar to that which ensures the transmission of knowledge. The sculptor, like the diviner, can initiate his son to his art, but the latter cannot practice it during his father's lifetime without taking the risk of killing him. This principle is also at work in this family. Each generation develops a style that is perfectly suited to its time. Since the son can only become an accomplished sculptor after his father's death,

The sculptor Horatsy who lived during the time when the "land was still Malagasy", in the last decades of the 19th century, is the first sculptor of Kivalo to be remembered, the founder of this line of sculptors

 

Horatsy seems to have drawn his inspiration from the classic work of making talismans and bilo statues, classic figurines that have until now remained closed to any evolution.

 

At the end of the 19th century, Maneraky, son of Horatsy, succeeded his father. He is known to have worked in Kivalo until the nineteen hundred and forties.

 

Yet Maneraky brings stylistic innovations that already announce

the manner of his grandson, Rasidany. The proportions leave more room for a

head, intended to wear a headdress (kepi, helmet, etc.), to the detriment of the

shorter and shorter.

 

Kambota, Rasidany and Rebiky are the most famous sculptors throughout the colonial period.

The sculptor Horatsy who lived during the time when the "land was still Malagasy", in the last decades of the 19th century, is the first sculptor of Kivalo to be remembered, the founder of this line of sculptors

 

Horatsy seems to have drawn his inspiration from the classic work of making talismans and bilo statues, classic figurines that have until now remained closed to any evolution.

 

At the end of the 19th century, Maneraky, son of Horatsy, succeeded his father. He is known to have worked in Kivalo until Rasidany, Maneraky's grandson, worked in sculpture for nearly fifty years. Its production covers all the sites in the region. The originality and the quality of his works have made him a recognized master and many times copied. He asserts his style through excess, showing extreme volumes.

 

With Rasidany, funeral sculpture will have known both its efflorescence and its end. When he died in 1989, the tradition of sculpted tombs had been abandoned for more than twenty years. Rasidany, at the end of his life, worked mostly for Europeans.

in the nineteen hundred and forty years.

 

Yet Maneraky brings stylistic innovations that already announce

the manner of his grandson, Rasidany. The proportions leave more room for a

head, intended to wear a headdress (kepi, helmet, etc.), to the detriment of the

shorter and shorter.

 

Kambota, Rasidany and Rebiky are the most famous sculptors throughout the colonial period.

Jacque Lombard

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